Posts Tagged ‘treatment’

Dr. Heather Woolery-Lloyd Talks Specific Beauty on HSN

In case you missed it, Specific Beauty was featured on HSN during the Beauty Hour from 8pm until 9pm on June 13, 2013. Dr. Heather Woolery-Lloyd explained the simplicity and effectiveness of her skincare line, Specific Beauty. Check out the entire Skin Brightening 4-piece Beauty Regimen, a Customer Pick on HSN!

Check out Heather getting ready for her segment on HSN!
Dr. Heather Woolery-Lloyd backstage at HSN

5 Surprising Benefits of Exercise for your Skin

Useful tips on caring for your dry winter skin

The health benefits of exercise are well known. It is not surprising that exercise improves your heart and lungs, but did you know that exercise could also help your skin. Here is a list covering the newest research on 5 surprising benefits of exercise for your skin

1) Exercise may improve acne

There is an often-shared myth that sweat from exercise causes acne. Multiple studies show that this is not the case. In one study they evaluated body acne in three groups. One group exercised 5 days per week and showered 1 hour after exercising, one group exercised 5 days per week and showered 4 hours after exercising, and one group did not exercise at all. At the end of two weeks they found no difference in body acne between the three groups. This study shatters the myth that sweat from exercise causes acne

In fact, exercise may in fact improve acne. In one study, women with abnormally high male hormones (also known as androgens) had lower androgen levels after regular exercise. Androgens are one of the many causes of hormonal acne in women.
These studies suggest that exercise certainly won’t hurt acne and may, in fact, make acne better.

2) Exercise decreases the risk of skin cancer

We are now learning that exercise reduces the risk of all types of cancer in fact, it may reduce your risk of skin cancer. In a recent animal study, mice that exercised had fewer skin cancers after 14 weeks when compared to controls that did not exercise. Researchers think that there is a link between excess fat and tumor growth, which could explain these interesting results. So please don’t use the sun as an excuse not to exercise. Instead exercise in the early morning or evening and, of course, wear sunscreen.

3) Exercise helps prevent psoriasis

In a recent study from Harvard School of Medicine, women who participated in vigorous exercise reduced their risk of developing psoriasis by 25-30 percent. This may be due to two well-known benefits of exercise, reduced inflammation and reduced stress. Inflammation is a major factor in psoriasis and, of course, stress makes all skin diseases, like psoriasis, worse. So if you have psoriasis or a family history of psoriasis, make sure you are exercising regularly.

4) Exercise helps prevent and treat varicose veins

Exercise is one of the most important and frequently overlooked treatments for people with varicose veins. This is because low impact exercise such as walking improves the muscle tone in the calves. Good muscle tone in this area helps to support the veins and improve blood flow back to the heart. Keep in mind, not all types of exercise are good for varicose veins. High impact exercises, such as running, may make them worse. However, low impact exercises along with compression stockings are simple interventions to improve circulation in people with varicose veins.

5) Exercise may help your skin look younger

There are many reasons why exercise can make you look younger. First, we all know topical antioxidants are important to prevent aging in our skin, but did you know that exercise increases antioxidant activity in our whole body! In one study, researchers found increased antioxidant activity in the blood of people immediately after exercising. Antioxidants prevent wrinkles and other signs of aging by combating damage to DNA and other vital structures in our skin cells.

Another often forgotten benefit of exercise is that it improves sleep. In one study, people who exercised over 20 minutes per day had 65% better sleep quality. We all know that a rested face is a youthful face, so exercise really helps our skin in that aspect.

Keep in mind that exercise also reduces stress and rapid weight fluctuations, which are other common causes of dull, tired, and sagging skin.

So there you have it, 5 absolutely indisputable reasons to start exercising. Your body AND SKIN will thank you for it!

Flowers for Your Skin – Orange Blossoms and Licorice

Vitamin C – The Natural Skin Rejuvenator

  • Proven to help acne
  • Proven to improve skin texture
  • Proven to improve skin pigmentation

TIP: If you have acne consider a vitamin C serum in addition to your standard acne treatment to get better results!

Licorice – The Natural Skin Brightener

  • Active components in licorice extract include Glabridin, Liquiritin, and Licochalcone A
  • Anti-inflammatory (Lichocalcone A is used for redness)
  • Treats pigmentation (Glabridin and Liquiritin are used for brown spots)

TIP: If you have uneven skin tone look for products with licorice as a natural skin brightener

Skin Cancer in African-Americans

Skin cancers are less frequently observed in African-American patients. Most likely, this decreased frequency is due to the photoprotection conferred by the melanin in darkly pigmented skin. But despite the lower risk to this patient population, African-American patients who develop skin cancers are faced with an increased morbidity and mortality, which is often a result of delayed diagnosis in this patient population.

In this column, I’ll take a closer look at the types of skin cancers that most often affect this patient population and discuss typical presentations of lesions in African-American patients.

Read the full article online here or click the image below to read the full PDF.

Getting to the Root of Pseudofolliculitis Barbae

First reported in 1908, pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) is a common inflammatory condition caused by ingrown hairs in the beard area of African-American and Hispanic men who have tightly coiled hair. Fox first noted the condition, and it was later described as pseudofolliculitis of the beard by Strauss and Kligman in 1956.1,2 Present in up to 83% of African-American men, this condition is characterized by inflamed papules and occasional pustules in the beard after close shaving.

Read the full article online here or click the image below to read the full PDF.

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